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dinemasporium

Latest version published by Ministry of Science and Techonology on Sep 2, 2019 Ministry of Science and Techonology

The anamorphic fungus Stauronema spinificis hitherto known only from the coastal grass Spinifex littoreus in India was collected on dead leaves of Spinifex littoreus in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA genes indicated a placement within Dinemasporium and confirmed that the species is distinct from the morphologically hardly distinguishable D. cruciferum, therefore, the new combination D. spinificis is proposed.

Data Records

The data in this occurrence resource has been published as a Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), which is a standardized format for sharing biodiversity data as a set of one or more data tables. The core data table contains 7 records.

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Data as a DwC-A file download 7 records in English (5 KB) - Update frequency: not planned
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Versions

The table below shows only published versions of the resource that are publicly accessible.

How to cite

Researchers should cite this work as follows:

32. Y.-H. Yeh & R. Kirschner*. A new record of Dinemasporium spinificis comb. nov. (= Stauronema spinificis) from Taiwan. Sydowia 2016 (May) 68: 49-55.

Rights

Researchers should respect the following rights statement:

The publisher and rights holder of this work is Ministry of Science and Techonology. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

This resource has been registered with GBIF, and assigned the following GBIF UUID: 19236b5a-5462-41af-a851-9dbc2eed47f2.  Ministry of Science and Techonology publishes this resource, and is itself registered in GBIF as a data publisher endorsed by Taiwan Biodiversity Information Facility.

Keywords

Fungi; coelomycetes; Occurrence of Dinemasporium; Dinemasporium cruciferarum; Stauronema spinificis; Taiwan

Contacts

Who created the resource:

Roland Kirschner
Professor
National Taiwan University TW

Who can answer questions about the resource:

Roland Kirschner
Professor
National Taiwan University TW

Who filled in the metadata:

Roland Kirschner
Professor
National Taiwan University TW

Who else was associated with the resource:

User
Roland Kirschner
Professor
National Taiwan University TW

Geographic Coverage

The anamorphic fungus Stauronema spinificis hitherto known only from the coastal grass Spinifex littoreus in India was collected on dead leaves of Spinifex littoreus in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA genes indicated a placement within Dinemasporium and confirmed that the species is distinct from the morphologically hardly distinguishable D. cruciferum, therefore, the new combination D. spinificis is proposed.

Bounding Coordinates South West [21.78, 119.795], North East [26.51, 123.662]

Taxonomic Coverage

The anamorphic fungus Stauronema spinificis hitherto known only from the coastal grass Spinifex littoreus in India was collected on dead leaves of Spinifex littoreus in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA genes indicated a placement within Dinemasporium and confirmed that the species is distinct from the morphologically hardly distinguishable D. cruciferum, therefore, the new combination D. spinificis is proposed.

Species  Dinemasporium spinificis

Project Data

As habitats of specialized organisms, sand beaches (including foredunes) are characterized by extremes of inundation and drought, poor plant-available soil nutrients on the one hand and alluvial deposition of organic matter on the other, high salinity, strong wind movement and solar irradiation. A particular vegetation is found along the sandy beaches, which includes many plants that do not occur inland, because they are outcompeted by other plants under more favorable growth conditions. Other organisms, such as animals and fungi are also adapted to this habitat and its vegetation, which are threatened by human activities such as tourism and construction. For the next future, rising sea-levels are expected to destroy this habitat completely so that the numerous organisms that have adapted to the particular environment will be lost. Although the natural vegetation along the sand shore of western Taiwan is of utmost importance for protecting the land from the sea and fungi may play important roles in the survival of the plants adapted to the particular environmental stress factors, the interaction of these plants with other organisms is poorly investigated. Studies in some other countries indicate the importance of endophytic Ascomycota and mycorrhizal Glomeromycota for protecting the plants and promoting their growth under the adverse growth conditions at sand dunes. The aim of the study is to explore the diversity of saprobic, endophytic and parasitic fungi associated with the dominant plants of coastal foredunes of Taiwan in order to get first insights into the potential ecological functions of fungi in sand coast vegetation.

Title 臺灣沙岸植被真菌多樣性的研究
Identifier NSC102–2621–B–008–001–MY3
Funding Ministry of Science and Technology

The personnel involved in the project:

Roland Kirschner

Sampling Methods

During the years 2012–2013, dead individuals of Sp. littoreus were collected in four locations distributed on sandy sites of western and southern Taiwan, namely beaches of two counties (Taoyuan, 25.047°N, 121.076°E, and Miaoli, 24.622°N, 120.756°E), an artificial plantation 200–300 m above sea level and at a distance of 2 km from the coast (Hengchun Tropical Botanic Garden, Pingtung County, 21.958°N, 120.811°E), and a coastal wet land close to the beach of Haomeiliao (Chiayi County, 23.360°N, 120.129°E). Samples were individually placed in plastic bags, returned to the laboratory and kept at 4°C until further processing.

Study Extent During the years 2012–2013, dead individuals of Sp. littoreus were collected in four locations distributed on sandy sites of western and southern Taiwan, namely beaches of two counties (Taoyuan, 25.047°N, 121.076°E, and Miaoli, 24.622°N, 120.756°E), an artificial plantation 200–300 m above sea level and at a distance of 2 km from the coast (Hengchun Tropical Botanic Garden, Pingtung County, 21.958°N, 120.811°E), and a coastal wet land close to the beach of Haomeiliao (Chiayi County, 23.360°N, 120.129°E). Samples were individually placed in plastic bags, returned to the laboratory and kept at 4°C until further processing.

Method step description:

  1. Plants and collection sites During the years 2012–2013, dead individuals of Sp. littoreus were collected in four locations distributed on sandy sites of western and southern Taiwan, namely beaches of two counties (Taoyuan, 25.047°N, 121.076°E, and Miaoli, 24.622°N, 120.756°E), an artificial plantation 200–300 m above sea level and at a distance of 2 km from the coast (Hengchun Tropical Botanic Garden, Pingtung County, 21.958°N, 120.811°E), and a coastal wet land close to the beach of Haomeiliao (Chiayi County, 23.360°N, 120.129°E). Samples were individually placed in plastic bags, returned to the laboratory and kept at 4°C until further processing. Isolation and cultivation For the isolation and cultivation of fungi, conidia were transferred to corn meal agar with 0.2% chloramphenicol (CMA, Fluka) with a flamed acupuncture needle from the conidiomata seen under a dissecting microscope. Then the specimen was dried and deposited in the Natural Museum of Natural Science, Taichung, Taiwan (TNM). The culture was deposited in the Bioresource Collection and Research Center, Hsinchu, Taiwan (BCRC). DNA isolation and molecular analysis DNA was extracted from the examined strains with Genomic DNA Spin Kit (Plant), according to the modified manufacturer’s protocol (Bioman Scientific Co., Ltd., Taiwan). The primer pair ITS1F/ITS4 was used for amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region of the ribosomal RNA gene (ITS rDNA) as in Yeh & Kirschner (2014). DNA sequencing was performed by Mission Biotech (Nankang, Taipei) with the same primers used for the PCR. The DNA sequences were edited using CodonCode Aligner version 4.0.1 (CodonCode Corporation, USA). Eleven ITS sequences belonging to six species of Dinemasporium downloaded from GenBank along with our two sequences of D. spinificis were used for phylogenetic analysis including Thozetella nivea as outgroup. Altogether 14 nucleotide sequences were aligned using the default options of MUSCLE implemented in MEGA6 (Tamura et al. 2013). The alignment was not manually manipulated but only trimmed to a block of 490 characters. The phylogenetic tree was inferred by using the Maximum Likelihood method with the default options of MEGA6, based on the Kimura 2-parameter model and 1000 bootstrap replications. Morphological study Description of micromorphology was based on dry leaf lamina samples. The samples were sectioned by hand and mounted in 10% (w/v) KOH solution. Statistical treatment of measurements was based on 30 measurements given as mean value ± standard deviation with outlier values given in brackets.

Collection Data

Collection Name TNM
Specimen preservation methods Dried

Additional Metadata

Alternative Identifiers http://ipt.taibif.tw/resource?r=dinemasporium